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Get your hands on Marion's NEW cookbook, Always Delicious. Shop now (we ship worldwide!)

Get your hands on Marion’s NEW cookbook, Always Delicious. Shop now (we ship worldwide!)

Thai Son-in-law Eggs

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These runny, gooey, savoury eggs are wonderful to serve as part of a banquet dinner if you have loved ones over – they go with everything! Pop your oil on to heat as part of your prep to keep things running smoothly.

WATCH THIS RECIPE

THAI SON-IN-LAW EGGS

PREP TIME

5 minutes

COOK TIME

25 minutes

SERVES

6

Ingredients

6 eggs, room temperature

vegetable oil for deep frying

3 tbsp roughly chopped coriander (cilantro) leaves

2 tbsp fried shallots*

1 long red chilli, finely sliced

 

Spicy tamarind sauce:

200g (7 oz) palm sugar*, shaved

¼ cup water

2½ tbsp fish sauce

2 tbsp tamarind concentrate*

1 lemongrass stalk, bruised and cut into batons

½ tsp dried chilli flakes (or to taste)

Steps

For the spicy tamarind sauce, place all the ingredients in a saucepan over high heat. Bring to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes or until thickened slightly. Remove from heat and discard the lemongrass stalks. Set aside for later (if your sauce thickens up too much as it cools, just add a little water and heat just before serving).

Cook the eggs in boiling water for 5 minutes. Drain and plunge into cold water. Peel the eggs and pat dry with paper towel (make sure they’re super dry before frying so you don’t get dangerous oil splatter!).

Fill a saucepan or wok to about 1/3 capacity with the vegetable oil. Heat over high heat. The oil is hot (325°F or 165°C) when a wooden spoon dipped into the oil forms small little bubbles. Carefully add the eggs and cook for 3-4 minutes or until golden and crispy on the outside. Drain on paper towel.

To serve, slice the eggs in half and place them on a serving plate. Drizzle generously with the spicy tamarind sauce. Sprinkle over the coriander, fried shallots and red chilli. Best served with steamed rice or as part of a Thai/Asian banquet dinner.

Note Icon

Notes:

– If palm sugar is unavailable, use half white and half brown sugar.

– Crispy fried shallots and tamarind concentrate are available in the Asian aisle of major supermarkets or from an Asian grocery store.

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